Wednesday, September 20, 2017

NATIONAL PALACE COLLECTIONS MUSEUM / HEATING - INDUSTRIAL AND KITCHEN TOOLS

Dolmabahçe, Beşiktaş - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°02'28.5"N 29°00'14.5"E / 41.041249, 29.004029



PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

A large portion of the collection contains the tools, equipment and machinery used as modern technology of the era, in the palaces, mansions and pavilions built during the Industrial Revolution period. In this group, there are the products produced of different materials and with different knowledge, which give information about the daily life and production technologies of the past, and show the invention-inventor-designer-manufacturer and vendor links.

The large collection containing a wide variety of products from stove to agricultural spraying instrument, from telegraph machine to projection device, from massage devices to dental unit, from cooking pot to washing machine has rare samples of the industrial design in the period of Ottoman Empire after 1850 and early Republican period. These articles, tools and machinery met with curiosity and used with excitement by the people of the palaces in the palace life are interesting as the first of many products that today we use in our daily lives.

Selections From The Collection

Ceramic Stove
Rococo decorations on the white ceramic surfaces, colored with gilt and pink colors, are available as bas-relief. Pink-color is applied to the corner transmissions. At the upper right side, there is a pulling cord and a ventilation handle in the form of metallic rod, which is not available today. The stove with an acroterium at its top has a semicircular arched cover placed at the front, in the lower furnace part.

Stereoscope
It is Paul Mall London brand. It magnifies 10 x 10 cm twin photographic images as on glass or printed on paper, and shows them to the viewer in three dimensions through its lens. It has been designed in such a way as to enable three people to see the photos at the same time. Placed on at the both sides in it, there are two accordions connected with the turning levers at the outside, and 75 photos can be placed in order at each side. When the symmetrically placed handles seen at the upper part is turned once, the photograph strip is turned once as well and consequently, the image is changed. It was used in the period of Sultan Abdülhamid II, who was highly interested in photos.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : National Palaces Administration

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 2593292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

NATIONAL PALACE COLLECTIONS MUSEUM / DECORATIVE WORKS OF ART

Dolmabahçe, Beşiktaş - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°02'28.5"N 29°00'14.5"E / 41.041249, 29.004029



PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

Decorative works of art constitute an important part of the National Palaces Collection These works of art that decorate various places of the palaces and the pavilions, can be gathered in three sections as Turkish, European and Far Eastern. In 19th century where the relations with the West were growing stronger, to buy luxury consumer goods exclusively from Europe for the palace and  the pavilions had become the vogue of the period.

The Sultans and the ladies of the Palaces bought lots of decorative works of art from local and foreign tradesmen residing in Galata and Beyoğlu and used them in the decoration of the palaces, the pavilions and the summer palaces. Another part of the decorative works of art found in the collection are sent by the empire members of the other countries. Besides, in Europe in many factories, decorative works of art are produced for the Ottoman market.

When studying the National Palaces Collection, we notice that a large part of the decorative works of art is of European origin. The larger section of these works of art made of porcelain, glass, metal material is formed by the porcelain vases. In general, many of these vases produced by the use of an extraordinary technique and great care where on a colored base golden gilding are made of French Sevres and Limoges porcelain.

Another part of the decorative art pieces of the palace collections are formed by the Far east vases of various sizes produces in Japan and China. Many of these works of art are formed by blue-white vases and they are complementary elements of the places constructed in an eclectic style.

During the reign of Sultan Abdülhamid II. (1876-1909), in the beginning of the 1890s with the construction of Yıldız Faience Imperial Factory, the period of Turkish porcelain started in the palaces, pavilions and summer palaces. Decorative art pieces constitute the larger part of the porcelains realized with an elegant taste. These works of art, with their original forms and decoration are unique pieces.

Each of the decorative works of art made of Yıldız porcelain occupying a special place in the National Palaces Porcelain Collection, with a documentary characteristic, proves to be important as in the following of our porcelain history.

Selections From The Collection

Vase 1
Bearing empiric influences, with a cylinder form widening to the upper part, on the one side of the lockets found on both sides of the lidded vase, German Emperor Wilhelm II. on the other side Postdam Palace are depicted in a naturalist style. On both sides of the frame of the vase, there exist eagle figures as the empire symbol and look like a relief handle. The laurel branches in relief issuing from the pedestal of the eagles as garlands envelop the frame of the vase.

On the lower part of the frame between garland, on  one of the lockets found in the middle and encircled with a set of pearl, R.W. letters with golden gilding   (It’s the monogram of the Emperor Wilhelm II.) and on the other one the Empire crown are depicted. The angel figures on both sides of the lid encircle the top depicted as the empire crown. The handle part has a cross form. On the whole surface, the golden gilding is used quite deeply. It is produced in Berlin Empire Factory (KPM). It is made with glazing surface, in relief with a mold, fixturing techniques.

Vase 2
With a large frame, the cylinder vase grows narrow to the upper part. The Bosporus scene existing on the blue base frame, though realist carries picturesque influences. On the backside and the entrance of the vase, you can see the Ottoman motifs. in the middle of the neck, the Ottoman state armorial bearings of the later period are designed. On this part in Arabic it is inscribed the Ottoman Empire’s emperor Abdülhamid Han, who reigned with the help of the German. The vase with the star and crescent seal is made with the glazing surface technique.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : National Palaces Administration

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 2593292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

NATIONAL PALACE COLLECTIONS MUSEUM / CALLIGRAPHY ART AND WRITING SETS

Dolmabahçe, Beşiktaş - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°02'28.5"N 29°00'14.5"E / 41.041249, 29.004029



PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

Dolmabahçe Palace Calligraphy Art and Writing Sets Collection cover works of art such as; calligraphy frames, writing sets, seals, emblems, marks and lockets, maps and table rings. The most important frames within Dolmabahçe Palace Calligraphy Collection, is the calligraphy art with Sultan Abdülmecid  (1839-1861) name. Sultan Abdülmecid, learned calligraphy art from Mehmed Tahir Efendi, the student of Mahmud Celaleddin who was a school and he got authorization.

The frames that he wrote by Arabic script exist in the collection. We possess also the frames belonging to the last caliph Abdülmecid Efendi, a member of the empire, known also by his keenness for art. Again, there exist tablets written by Yesari-zade Mustafa İzzet Efendi, Sheik Mehmed Abdülaziz Rıfai, Şefik Bey, who were among the most famous calligrapher of the period.

In National Palaces Calligraphy Art and Writing Sets Collection, the Writing Sets occupy a quite larger place. Writing sets, generally are formed of pen-case with inkwell, pen, sandbox, inkpot, clippers, pen-knife, scissors and blotter.

In the collection, the crystal, metal and casting writing sets exist. The writing set carrying Sultan Abdülhamid II. (1876-1909)  sultan's signature and inkpot, the writing set with "AH" initials  (the first letters of Sultan Abdülhamid), a writing set presented to Sultan Reşad (1909-1918) during his visit to Salonika, are among the precious objects of the collection.

We can see that the seal of Ottoman Parliament found on the casting writing sets, after the foundation of TBMM, is used by Arabic letters as "TBMM". The changes undergone by the seals found on the casting writing sets, are at the same time, the examples of the changes in our political history and the memories of those days.

Selections From The Collection

Tablet
It is written on black ground in zerendud style and with Arabic script. On the tablet, "Kullema dahale aleyha Zekeriyya el-mihrab" is written that is known also as verse of mihrab. Dating of 1282 hegira (1865-66) the tablet is signed of "Ketebehu Abdülmecid bin Mahmud Han". It has a frame with a sheet whose sideline is decorated with botanical motifs. It measures 84 x 41 cm.

Writing Set
The French writing set is formed of nine pieces as a pair of crystal inkpot, blotter, pen handles, pen-knife, envelope, letter openers and seal. The gilding brass part, in empire style is decorated botanical motifs. On the lids of inkpot there exist armorial bearings. The inside of the case of leather, is covered by silk and velvet tissue.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : National Palaces Administration

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 2593292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

Monday, September 11, 2017

NATIONAL PALACE COLLECTION MUSEUM / TEXTILES

Dolmabahçe, Beşiktaş - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°02'28.5"N 29°00'14.5"E / 41.041249, 29.004029



The embroidered works of art in the Textile Collection of the National Palaces consist of the original samples from the early 19th and late 20th centuries; by which new and traditional arts are re-interpreted. The Textile Collection of the National Palaces contains the works of art made of a wide variety of materials, particularly yashmak bundles, style covers, tablecloths, prayer rugs, sherbet towels (mahlama), ablution towels, women's clothing, and religious clothes.

Due to the customs in the Place life, newly appeared by the effect of westernization, an increase is observed in terms of material in comparison with the previous century. When discussed in general,  it is seen that some embroidery techniques such as sequinning, entwisting and chain works, especially dival work, which was the most favorite embroidery technique in its period, are preferred in a large part of the collection.

The motifs in the embroideries are used with the arrangements made in the form of borders, which are scattered from a center or created by repeating more than one motif. In addition, it is observed that the motifs are depicted sometimes by being stylized, and in some processes, in a very naturalistic way.

The collection pieces are embroidered with a wide variety of color tones. A realistic style is used in the embroideries, with the depth obtained by shading in different colors. The collection contains also a group of leather works embroidered with the dival and entwisting techniques.

The collection has a nature of document regarding the embroideries of the late period Ottoman palace; and consists of the embroideries made by the bazaar masters as well as the people of the harem and girls’ home in the last period of the Empire.

The Factory Hereke founded in 1843 during the period of Sultan Abdülmecid (1839-1861), played an important role in furnishing the palaces of that era, with its wide variety of high quality fabrics. Besides the drapery and upholstery fabrics used in furnishing the palace, Hereke Imperial Factory has also woven some other products such as a variety of garments and towels as well as the gifts given to the guests.

Also the upholstery fabrics used in the holy places of Mecca and Medina, and especially the Kaaba’s cover (kisvetü'l-Kaaba) used to be woven in Hereke Imperial Factory. And the regimental banners given to the new military units (regiments) constituted during the World War II have been woven in that factory as well.

Besides its service for the palaces and royal authority, it has also made determining contributions for representation of the caliphate authority. In Hereke fabrics, the original comments and statements reflecting the Ottoman’s identity have created a specific style, besides the designs effected by the West. Almost all of the curtains and furniture upholsteries used in the structures of the National Palaces are made from Hereke silk fabrics.

Selections From The Collection

Prayer rug
In the Ottoman palaces, the most magnificent examples of the prayer rugs have been used, which are merged with the Islamic beliefs and religious services, and which are the materials intended for performing the salaat and special to the person. Prayer rug has been called "namazlık" in the palace.

Style Covers
The style covers are the round shaped covers with a diameter of one meter in general, surface and middle of which have brimful and central embroideries respectively, which have edges with tinsel fringe or tinsel-mixture. Stile cover hanging down in front of the tray, on which coffee cups are placed, during the coffee presentation ceremonies in the harem section of the Palaces and mansions, used to add a visual richness to the presentation with its magnificent embroideries.

The condition of the work of art is high, and besides, it is a rare artifact in terms of the processing technique of the period and its composition. 28 pieces of modern museum showcases, an exhibition space for kitchen tools and open exhibition platforms have been created with intent to use in the exhibition arrangement and to ensure as many objects as possible to meet the visitors. The exhibition showcases are made of the materials with a high resistance to external effects, steel bearing system and coating, in order to exhibit heavy and big objects, and ensuring weather and dust sealing.

Panels and fabric coatings with the features complying with the international museum standards have been applied to the interior coatings of the showcases; and special laminated glasses have been used in the showcase windows, in order to ensure the protection and proper appearance of the objects.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : National Palaces Administration

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 2593292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

NATIONAL PALACE COLLECTIONS MUSEUM / TABLE SETS

Dolmabahçe, Beşiktaş - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°02'28.5"N 29°00'14.5"E / 41.041249, 29.004029



PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

In the National Palaces Collection, the porcelain tableware, which have an important place with their elegance and quality, consists of porcelain dinner sets, tea and coffee sets, mugs, dishes and aşure bowls. These artworks, most of them which date back to the late 19th and early 20th centuries, are classified in three groups as Turkish, European and Far Eastern porcelains.

Majority of the porcelain table sets consists of the porcelain tableware produced by some exclusive brands such as European Limoges, Sevres, Meissen, as suitable for the Ottoman market and according to the inclination of the Turkish people. These artworks have been taken to the Palace as gifts through the agency of the ambassadors or by purchases with special orders, from some European countries, with which the Ottoman Empire has political, cultural, economic relations, such as France, Germany and Britain.

Yıldız Imperial Factory, built in the outer garden of Yıldız Palace between 1890-1892 by the order of Sultan Abdülhamid II (1876 - 1909), has played an important role in revitalizing the Turkish ceramics and porcelain tradition and bringing the porcelain industry from Europe to the country. Among the products of the factory, the majority consists of also the tea and coffee sets and dishes, besides the decorative pieces such as wall plates and vases.

Some part of the tableware in the National Palaces Collection consists of table equipment made of silver, silver plated material, gold plated silver or other metal alloys. Supply of the tableware diversified in terms of functionality to the Ottoman palace is in parallel with the change in the traditional features of the Ottoman’s table manners (eating according to the European manners ie, eating at the table by use of knife and fork, instead of eating by hand and by sitting on the floor) and its spread. These changes are observed particularly in hosting the foreign diplomats.

Sultan Abdulhamid II have ordered silver tableware from Europe, and this tableware have been used during hosting the foreign dynasties or other senior members in the official banquets (imperial banquet)given in their honor, in parallel with the intensification of diplomatic relations of  the Ottoman Empire with Europe. The surviving parts of the collection are mainly French (Paris) based, which bear the signatures of the manufacturers preferred by also the European elites of that era, such as Odiot, Christofle, and Henri Soufflet.

In the Crystal and Glass Table Sets of the National Palaces Collection, there exist the artworks consisting of the special products of the most famous manufacturers of 19th century in the foreign glass industry and art. Among the sets of the collection, most of which have been made in Europe, the crystals produced in the factory located in Moser that was in Karlsbad region (today known as Karlovy Vary) in the territory of the Austro-Hungarian Empire at the time; and in the factory located in Baccarrat in France, are the examples of the important products in the world.

Among these sets dazzling with their elegance and brightness, designed and manufactured for use in the banquets organized in the palace as well as for use in the daily life, there are punches, liquor, wine and champagne glasses, decanters, water and lemonade glasses, cups, bowls, sugar bowls, ice cream cups and candy boxes. Some of the artworks bear the sultan's signature of Sultan Abdulhamid II (1876 - 1909) and Sultan Abdülaziz (1861 - 1876) as well as Ottoman coat of arms. In the crystal artworks, most of which have been applied cutting and scraping techniques, gold plating, stylized plant and floral motifs, and geometric splice are seen as ornaments.

Selections From The Collection

Teapot
It is strapping person’s work and has been made in France. It reflects the air of Rococo. It has a bulbous body, extroverted legs and a cap. The handle decorated with convolutions is combined with ivory at the two points. The cover’s top is in the form of cast and appliqued leaf and seed. And its spout part is adorned with stylized leaves processed as embossed decor.

Soup Plate
The objects made of gold plated silver have been ordered in the period of Sultan Mahmut II with Odiot’s workshop in Paris. It is one of the oldest tableware tools of the National Palaces collection, made of precious metals. It reflects the Neo-classical air. The plate edges are surrounded by stylized acanthus leaves processed as embossed decor.

Crystal Pitcher
It is made of crystal. Its rim is gilded. It bears the Ottoman coat of arms and the letters A.H. symbolizing Sultan Abdülhamid. It is from the Royal 9000 series produced for the kings and rulers in 1907, by the factory Moser founded in 1893 in Karlsbad. It has been produced specifically for the Sultan, upon order of Sultan Abdülhamid II. It bears the label of the factory Moser at its bottom part.

Pitcher Set
The set consisting of 1 pitcher and 2 glasses has been produced in the factory Baccarat, founded in Paris in 1765. The factory Baccarat that began to produce the products ordered by the rulers of the countries ever since the date at which Loui XVIII, the King of France placed an order with it for the classes set, has also attracted the attention of the Ottoman Sultans. The orders for the palaces were placed with the factory Baccarat in 1830 for the first time.

The feet of the crystal glasses and jugs are in the form of flower. On the belly part of the set, there is a king’s crown and the letters A.H. made by the scraping method. There are the letters A.H. on the glass covers made of 18 k. gold, and the tops are in the form of star and crescent. The label of "Baccarat" is available at the basal parts of the artworks.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : National Palaces Administration

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 2593292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

NATIONAL PALACE COLLECTIONS MUSEUM / LIGHTING INSTRUMENTS

Dolmabahçe, Beşiktaş - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°02'28.5"N 29°00'14.5"E / 41.041249, 29.004029



PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

Crystal chandeliers and candle holders constitute the most important group of the Lighting Instruments Collections. Besides the crystal works, with a variety of lighting tools like other chandeliers, candle holders, lamps, wall fixture, bracket, lantern and small lamps containing the characteristic of the style and decoration of the period, the collection covers a quite large scope. In Dolmabahçe Palace and Beylerbeyi Palace, the lighting is provided with crystal chandeliers and candle holders which were the art works of the glass producers of 19th century.

The political atmosphere of the period, the commercial treaties, the international exhibitions organized by England and France, played an important role for the entry of said technological and art pieces to the Ottoman palaces. In Dolmabahçe Palace, English crystal chandeliers of a large dimension exist in Mabeyn and Muayede Salons. Beylerbeyi Palace constructed under Sultan Abdülaziz (1861-1876), looks like a crystal museum with its colorful crystal chandeliers and candle holders that are products of French Baccarat.

On the other hand the Italian glass Murano, though losing its former power and importance in 19th century, with the elegant examples finds its way in the collection. In silver art works that constitute an important part of the Lighting Instruments Collections, candle holders and lanterns embroidered on behalf of Pertevnival Valide Sultan, the mother of Sultan Abdülaziz, are highlighted as works of art for sultanate. In the period of Sultan II. Abdülhamid (1876-1909), Tamirhane-i Humayun that was working in Yıldız Palace produced two candle holders with a stem that are shown as the Ottoman products, among the rare and precious works of art of the colelction.

With the construction of Dolmabahçe Palace, besides the works of art ordered and bought in the period of Sultan Abdülmecid (1839-1861), with the English and French-Baccarat crystals bought in the period of Sultan Abdülaziz, during the reign of Sultan Abdülhamid II (1876-1909), with the the works of art bought according to the local taste and preference from the foreign commerçants working in the Ottoman Empire and entered into the Palace as presents, the collection grew richer.

Selections From The Collection

Crystal Chandelier-1
In the Muayede Salon with 56 column, exceeding 2000 square meter where exchange of greetings during religious holidays were taking place, at the splendid dome with a height of 36 meter, the chandelier of 4,5 ton, with 454 lighting candles hanging from a pyramidal glass construction under the roof, as a unique work of art highlighting the esthetic and technological features of the period, is one of the most precious art works in Dolmabahçe Palace and National Palaces.

Crystal Chandelier-2
This chandelier is produced in the period before the beginning of the use of electricity as the power source in lighting. Since gas was used as the fuel element, this belongs to the group named as "Chandelier of Gas Period". Later, after the installation of electricity in the palace, the lighting was ensured by electrical bulbs. The chandelier is made of transparent crystal unities of highest quality, gathered on the main conveyor bar. On various sized crystal branches that mount on narrow threes steps, with 60 decorative lanterns decorated with engraving technology, it carries the role of lighting with 60 electric bulbs.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : National Palaces Administration

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 2593292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, September 9, 2017

NATIONAL PALACES PAINTINGS MUSEUM

Dolmabahçe, Beşiktaş - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°02'22.7"N 29°00'10.2"E / 41.039636, 29.002839



PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

National Palaces Painting Museum (Turkish: Milli Saraylar Resim Müzesi) is an art museum in Istanbul, Turkey, opened at the Crown Prince Residence of Dolmabahçe Palace in 2014. The museum exhibits approximately 200 pieces from the palace's collection of paintings by both Turkish and international artists of the 19th century. The museum is funded by the TBMM.

A collection of 202 beautiful oil paintings done by Ivan Aivazovsky, Gustave Boulanger, Eugene Fromentin, Jean Leon Gerome, Stanislaw Chlebowski, Sandor Svaboda, Fausto Zonaro, Felix Ziem, Theo Van Rysselberghe, Karl Joseph Kuwasseg, Osman Hamdi Bey, Osman Nuri Paşa, Halil Paşa, Sekrit Dag and Omer Ben Mustafa is on display in the palace.

The historical building used to house the Istanbul Art and Sculpture Museum which was founded within the order of Turkey's first president Mustafa Kemal Atatürk in 1937 and served as part of Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University. After the renovation between 2010 and 2014, it was transformed into a new museum to house pieces of 19th and early-20th century art, which were mainly gathered from the palaces of Ottoman dynasty.

A portion of the Dolmabahçe Palace’s crown prince area, where the sultans’ sons were residing in the time of Sultan Abdülmecid, has been turned into the National Palaces Painting Museum after a seven-year restoration process.

Paintings on various subjects and in diverse styles by Turkish and foreign painters grace the walls of the palace’s salons and chambers. A major part of the collection was assembled during the reign of Sultan Abdülaziz. The purchase of paintings in this period was made possible through the painter Şeker Ahmet Pasha, who was the sultan’s art consultant. Among them are works by artists such as Daubigny, Schreyer, Fromentin and Gérome.

A collection of 202 oil paintings is on display in the palace. The collection also includes paintings by Gustave Boulanger, Jean-Léon Gérôme, Eugène Fromentin, Stanisław Chlebowski, Félix Ziem, Karl Joseph Kuwasseg, Fausto Zonaro, Théo van Rysselberghe and Alexander Sandor Svoboda. There are also paintings by Turkish painters such as Osman Hamdi Bey, Halil Pasha and Osman Nuri Pasha in this art museum.

The palace collection also includes 30 oil paintings by Ivan Kostantinovich Ayvazovsky, who was in Istanbul prior to and during the reign of Sultan Abdülaziz, and 20 works in various techniques by Fausto Zonaro, Sultan Abdülhamid II’s Chief Palace Painter. Besides the works of painters of military origin such as Captain Ali Rıza, Lieutenant Commander Hasan Behçet and Şeker Ahmet Pasha, those of other artists like Halife Abdülmecid, Osman Hamdi Bey and Hikmet Onat, all well-known pioneers in the art of Turkish painting, have also been added to the collection.

The “understanding of accumulating” in the period of Sultan Abdülmecid (1839-1861), in which the paintings presented to the palace are predominant, led to the understanding of collecting works of art in the period of  Sultan Abdülaziz (1861-1876). The relation between Ahmed Ali (Sugar Ahmed Pasha), who studied painting in Europe, and his French teacher Jean-Léon Gérôme has shown some effects that have reached up to the palace.

He turned the accumulation in the palace into a collection, with the works of art purchased from Goupil Art Gallery in Paris that belongs to his father-in law, upon the orders of the palace and recommendations of Gérôme. Some painters such as the Polish painter Stanislaw Chlebowski who has served in the Palace; French Pierre Désiré Guillemet who has drawn pictures for the Palace, and Russian Ivan Konstantinovic Aivazovskythe have strengthened that accumulation.

The collection of the Palace has been diversified with the paintings of the  Italian painter Luigi Acquarone (1800-1896) in the period of Sultan Abdülhamid II (1876-1909), and with the paintings of Fausto Zonaro (1854-1929), another Italian painter,  who has served in the palace after his death, the portraits of the Western rulers given to the dynasty as a gift, as well as the works of art of the soldier painters, painters from Darüşşafaka (Ottoman Secondary School for Orphans) and the painters graduated from Sanayi-i Nefise (Academy of Fine of Fine Arts). At the end of the 19th century, an important accumulation was created in the painting collection, with the paintings entered the Palace in consequence of the exhibitions held in Turkey.

A rich accumulation consisting of the works of art in Dolmabahçe Palace, Beylerbeyi Palace, Yıldız Şale, Küçüksu Pavilion, Aynalıkavak Pavilion, Maslak Pavilion, and Yalova Atatürk Mansion constitutes the Paintings Collection of the National Palaces. Dolmabahçe Palace that hosted the first painting collection of our country has the majority in terms of the number of works of art. There exist very valuable signatures on some works of art among the orientalist paintings reflecting the mystery of the East, nature and city images, historical paintings and portraits.

Collection
The museum has more than 200 paintings displayed in 11 sections. Some of the displayed collections are listed below.

Paintings by Turkish Artists (1870-1930)
This collection consists of works by Ottoman/Turkish artists such as Şeker Ahmed Pasha, Osman Hamdi Bey, Hüseyin Zekai Pasha and Hoca Ali Rıza; which make up the second, third and fourth generation of the Turkish painting in Western sense.

Paintings by Court Painters
Works by artists such as Stanislaw Chlebowski and Fausto Zonaro, which respectively served to Sultan Abdülaziz I and Sultan Abdülhamid II as their court painters.

Paintings Bought from Goupil Gallery for the Palace
Two sections consist of paintings that were bought from the Goupil Gallery in Paris during the reign of Sultan Abdülaziz I. The paintings that were bought in this era reflect the taste of Sultan Abdülaziz and his assistant Şeker Ahmed Pasha. A Western style collection of paintings was brought together for the first time at the Dolmabahçe Palace during the reign of Sultan Abdülaziz.

Paintings by Ivan Aivazovsky
The Ceremony Hall, which is the most magnificent room of the structure with its stucco-lined walls and composite-headed plasters, is allocated to the Russian artist Aivazovsky.

Paintings by Abdülmecid II
The hall that exhibits this collection originally used to be the library of Sultan Abdülmecid II himself, who was born to become the last crown prince and caliph of the Ottoman dynasty. Interested in almost all branches of art, but particularly calligraphy and music, he remained a celebrated artist of Turkish painting.

Orientalist Paintings
The museum has a rich collection of works by 19th century Orientalist painters.

Photos Collection

As for the Photo Collection of the National Palaces, it has an important place in the Ottoman photography art developed within the triangle of Sultan-photographer-society. The collection consists of an important accumulation, which carries to our time the agenda of the Ottoman Empire, mainly that of the 33 years of period of Sultan Abdülhamid II. Sultan Abdülhamid II has attached much importance to photograph; followed up both his country and the foreign countries through the photographs; and moreover, he has made character tests on the photographs.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : National Palaces Administration

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 2593292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

NATIONAL PALACE COLLECTIONS MUSEUM / FURNITURES

Dolmabahçe, Beşiktaş - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°02'28.5"N 29°00'14.5"E / 41.041249, 29.004029



PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

As the requirement of its functions, furniture constitutes the main works of art group for furnishing the palaces, mansions and pavilions. Its collection generally consists of eclectical style furniture. The period of Sultan Abdülhamid II. (1876-1909) coincides with the period in which the Art Nouveau style experienced; and there are many examples of this style in the palace. This is important in terms of the fact that this period has been experienced in the palace.

When 19th century is examined in general, it is seen that the East and West were influenced by one another with respect to art. The Western artists produced many orientalist style works of art in this period. There is also furniture in this type of production, examples of which have taken place in the collection. Supply of the European origin furniture was mainly realized by means of customer specific production depending on the usage, purpose and place.

This can be understood from the motifs on the European origin furniture in the palace, such as Ottoman coat of arms, sultan's signatures, regimental banners, weapons and stars and crescents. Sometimes they have been supplied by selecting in the catalogs and then placing orders. Besides European furniture, furniture has also been imported from America and the Far East. In addition, there are sets of Far East imitation furniture among the ones imported from Europe.

Another part of the furniture used in the Palace, are the domestic production. At that time, these were purchased from some wok shops opened in Galata, Pera and Nişantaşı, such as the Carpenter Factories of Narlıyan, Psalty, Hakkı Usta, Mora Biraderler, and Refik Bey.

And some part of the furniture used in the palace and available today in our collection is the one produced in the carpenter's shop (Tamirhâne-i Hümâyûn), which was active in Yıldız Palace during the period of Sultan Abdülhamid II. The sultan, who used to carry out this activity when he was a prince, continued to do the same during his reign as well, in his workshop located in the palace, and in the time remaining behind the state affairs.

Besides the furniture produced by him, the furniture produced by some artisans, who worked in the carpenter's shop (Tamirhâne-i Hümâyûn), such as Painter Emil Meinz has also used in the palace. Star and crescent motifs have been used as a decorative element in a large part of the furniture manufactured in Tamirhâne-i Hümâyûn. On this furniture, there exists a stamp or metal plate including the words "made in Tamirhâne-i Hümâyûn", date and name of the master.

Selections From The Collection

Table
The small-sized center table with an octangular tray and eight legs, located in the second hall above the corridor providing passage between the Dolmabahçe Palace’s portions reserved exclusively for men and women, has been manufactured in Tamirhâne-i Hümâyûn. On the brass plate on it bears the date 1315 (1900) and signature of Giritli Mustafa. There are star and crescent motifs in the sunburst-shaped cartridges on the table edge of the coffee table decorated with copper, brass and mother-of-pearl studded on wood, with rumi-hatayi motifs and geometric multi-beam stars motifs.

Center Table
The center table processed with tortoiseshell  and brass material by use of boulle technique, located in the Red Room that has been used as reception room in Harem part of Dolmabahçe Palace (portion reserved exclusively for women). There exist contours decorated with gilt bronze ornaments on the legs and table edges, in such a way as to surround the sultan’s signature. The naturalistic flower and leaf motifs located on the table tray are the porcelain pieces placed by carving the tray.

Decoration with porcelain is generally made by placing porcelain plates with picture into the places on the furniture, determined with frames. As for this example, which can be rarely seen, the porcelain parts are given the shape of the flowers, and each part is placed in its place specially opened for it.

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WEB SITE : National Palaces Administration

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 2593292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

NATIONAL PALACE COLLECTIONS MUSEUM / CARPET

Dolmabahçe, Beşiktaş - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°02'28.5"N 29°00'14.5"E / 41.041249, 29.004029



PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

Hereke carpets reflecting mostly the style characteristics of the period constitute an important part of the National Palaces Collection. But as the constructions of the palaces, pavilions and the summer palaces date long ago from 1891 when the Hereke Factory begun the production of the carpets, considering the trade based on the political relations of the period and in the light of the objects found in the depots of the National Palaces and as to the evaluation during the formation period of the depots, it appears that the first carpet examples in the decoration of the palaces, pavilions and the summer palaces are made of English, Uşak and Gördes carpets.

Before the beginning of the carpet production by the factory, the fact that many carpets were bought from various places and countries for the palaces, can be followed from the archives documents as regards the dates and the types. Among them European carpets named as "Frenk" (mostly French carpets), English carpets, Gördes carpets and Uşak carpets stand for the mostly bought types.

Apart them, in the collection, you can find among local carpets Sivas, Demirci, Kayseri, Avanos, Kırşehir, Kula carpet and prayer rugs. Besides, Feshane Factory in Defterdar ensured carpets to the palaces. In the collection among the carpets with an eastern origin, Iran, Hamedan, Khorasan, Siraz, Tabriz, Keşan, Samarkand carpets are also found.

Especially, the examples of Samarkand carpets with a rare color and size are found today in Yıldız Chalet, Dolmabahçe Palace and Beylerbeyi Palace. Tebriz carpets, Şiraz prayer rugs, Keşan carpet and prayer rugs among these kind of carpets, continue to exist as the eastern representative of the "Last Ottoman Palaces and Pavilions" that gather the eastern and Western civilizations.

Among the carpets of European origin of the collection, for instance French Aubusson, Savonnerie carpets and English, Brussels, Greece (1 example) carpets are found. The collection that was formed through buying, the production of Hereke Factory and presents, was transported by the carriage of the objects between the palaces and the pavilions and finally gained its actual appearance.

Selections From The Collection

Hereke Carpet
Among the most popular art works in the National Palaces Collection, the scheme of the Hereke carpet unique by its measure and conception  is made by Emil Meinz, the palace painter, in 1898 and it is situated in Yıldız Şale number 1 Ceremony Hall. The conception of the carpet is made together by the pictures of the roof and of the wall decorating the ceremony hall. In the center of the carpet, together with the ellipse locket and in total three lockets are conceived by taking into account the projections of the hall’s chandeliers.

Another feature of the art work is that both in Yıldız Şale Ceremony Hall and in some of the rooms and halls of Dolmabahçe Palace, it is weaved as to cover all over the ground. The middle section of the carpet is made of one part, the side bordure and the emerging tower are made as supplement. The supplement parts are situated skillfully with a qualified handwork and the wholeness of the pattern is ensured.

The Hereke Palace carpets, the stylized production of the Hereke Factory, are designed in unique pattern and color. Cream-colored ground, corner stuffs with red ground, large curls in rumi style found on lockets and on the corners are seen as the classical elements in Hereke palace carpets.

As long as the lockets, emblems and the filling of the corners are concerned, rumi style is used. On four sides of the oval locket emblems are situated. Among the large curls in rumi style on the locket we can see scattered flower motifs in naturalist style. The large bordure ın the middle is made of hatayi and Chinese cloud motifs on a cream ground.

Hatay is continue alternately with cream and blue ground,  the distance and the sides is made of a large rumi style ornated with Chinese clouds. The fine bordures situated on both sides of the large bordure are separated into sections. The large bordure in the middle of the outside bordure is made of emblem and rose motifs.

Woolen Hereke Carpet
With approximately 124 m2 it bears the characteristic to be the biggest carpet in Dolmabahçe Palace. This carpet with locket and in relief motifs is weaved completely in European style. The carpet with the oval locket, oyster motifs, with its S an C curlings, with its design reflecting a painting by the use of different tones of the same color, is the best application where the Western patterns are reflected.

In some sections by the cutting high of naps, the motifs are given as in relief. In Dolmabahçe Palace, the first examples of European style carpets in relief are English and French carpets. Later, with the orders of Abdülhamid II in Hereke carpets in relief that look like them, velvet carpets as named in the documents are weaved.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : National Palaces Administration

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 2593292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

Sunday, September 3, 2017

NATIONAL PALACE COLLECTIONS MUSEUM

Dolmabahçe, Beşiktaş - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°02'28.5"N 29°00'14.5"E / 41.041249, 29.004029



PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

In 2006, within the buildings of Matbah-ı Amire ( (Dolmabahçe Palace Kitchens) situated towards Beşiktaş, in order to gather and to protect in a modern depot the objects that remain close in the depots of Dolmabahçe Palace and that the visitors are unable to see in the inspected places of the palace, it was decided to constitute a depot-museum.

Within the scope of this project, first af all the Depot-Museum that was formed by the transportation to this place approximately 20.000 objects, was also open to visitors. But, as the exhibition capacity was not enough, “Palace Collections Museum” project, that would contain museum, art gallery and depots, was established in order to be able to exhibit many examples of all the collections found in the depot unities.

This project covered in priority, the spaces that were used before as offices and depots of the Matbah-ı Amire set of building, by a total restoration, the whole space of 2000 m2 was put to use within Palace Collections Museum. To use in the exhibition arrangement and to present the visitors with the objects as much as possible, 28 modern museum show-rooms, a space for the exhibition of kitchen tools and open exhibition platforms are constituted.

Exhibition show-rooms, were formed of materials of high resistance to outdoor impacts and of steel carrier systems and coating in order to exhibit the heavy and large objects and to ensure the impermeability of air and dust. As regards the inside coatings of the show rooms, according to the international museum standards panel and cloth coating applications were realized, as to the show room glasses special laminated glass was used to ensure the protection of the objects and to give them the right perspective.

Museum Exhibition Collection

The main theme of the Palace Collections Museum, first of all Dolmabahçe Palace, is to bring into light the objects and to make them open to the visitors, which were used in 19th century Ottoman palaces in daily life and which are found in the inventory of National Palaces. With the objects exhibited in the Palace Collections Museum, it is destined to procure the traces that could explain to the visitors the daily life in the Palace in 19th century. All the works of art found in the museum, are the products, the original examples of a period where Ottoman palace followed closely the developments worldwide.

The Collection is constituted, besides the objects used in Dolmabahçe Palace, of the art works witnessing the last 70 years of the Ottoman Empire in Aynalıkavak, Küçüksu, Ihlamur, Maslak Summer Palaces and Beylerbeyi and Yıldız Palaces. The sources of the art works exhibited in this museum are various. Among them, besides the objects ordered for the palace in or out of the country, you can also notice various objects brought to the palace as presents.

Also you can find various pieces produced especially in the palace’s carpenter’s shop intrinsically. In the Palace Collections Museum art works are exhibited under certain subject titles: Palace Child’s dresses, Sultan Dürrüşehvar, Furniture, Calligraphy art and Writing Sets, Porcelain, Embroidered Art works, Silver Set of Table linens, Crystal Set of Table linens, Hereke Factory, Lighting, Heating, Health and Industrial Tools, Paintings, Watches and Music Instruments, Books.

Among the exhibited art works, there exist a huge collection formed of dresses, toys, handyworks used by princes and princesses, writing sets, seals, writing tools, examples of writing sets used in Meclis-i Mebusan and the first TBMM, medecine chest and medecines, rhumatisma choc tool, dentist’s unity, silver shaving sets belonging to emperors, cleaning and care tools belonging to the mother of reigning sultans, crystal, porcelain, silver sets of table, crystal offering sets, hand writing Kuran-ı Kerim, perception bags, embroidered prayer rugs and covering cloths, kitchen tools, hereke carpets, yıldız porcelain goods, watches, faience stoves, industrail tools, books from the palace’s library painting tools belonging to califat Abdülmecid Efendi, paintings in oil paint, lighting tools, decorative tools and candle holders.

In Palace Collections Museum, a selection of 5.000 works of art reflecting the whole collection and selected among about 43.000 historical objects found in the depot section.

The entry of the museum welcomes the periodic exhibitions as an art gallery. The collection section is arranged as the selected art works welcome the visitors in the conception of permanent museum. In the depot section of Palace Collections Museum, that is the last section, all objects are stored with modern technology and are upkeeped periodically. Also this section remains open to the use of experts and researchers.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : National Palaces Administration

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 2593292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

DOLMABAHCE PALACE / HAREM-I HÜMAYUN

Dolmabahçe, Beşiktaş - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°02'21.9"N 29°00'06.2"E / 41.039403, 29.001728



PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

Other principal sections are the suite of the Valide Sultan (sultan’s mother), the so-called Blue and Pink salons, the bedrooms of sultans Abdülmecid, Abdülaziz and Mehmed V. Reşad, the section housing the lower ranking palace women known as the Cariyeler Dairesi, the rooms of the sultan’s wives (kadınefendi), and the study and bedroom used by Atatürk. All the main rooms are furnished with valuable carpets, ornaments, paintings, chandeliers and calligraphic panels.

HAREM ENTRANCE HALL

Harem entrance hall is in the middle level of the Sultan’s apartment in the Harem. The two entrances (one facing the Bosphorus strait, the other facing the rear courtyard) were used by the Sultan for entering or leaving the Royal quarters. The rooms adjoining the hall were allocated to the use of the women who served the Sultan (Cariye). On either side of the staircase stand two pink vase candelabras which are the rare examples of Turkish made lighting accessories found in the Palace collection.

The doors leading to the main Harem entry hall are directly across from the door leading to the mother’s apartment and lead from the Harem garden and street. The carriages of the women going on a visit outside the palace would line up in front of this door and the women would be escorted through the door of the Sultan’s mother. The frescoes that line the borders of the ceiling are among the main features of this hall which are decorated with some interesting furnishings, like the large vase and tray of malachite, a malchalite table and end tables, a table clock veneered with malchalite.

HAREM-I HÜMAYUN

The self-contained Harem occupies two thirds of the palace, corridors linking it to the Mabeyn and the Ceremonial Hall. Access to the Harem was by iron and wooden doors, through which only the sultan could pass freely. Here are a series of salons and galleries whose windows look out onto the İstanbul Strait, and leading off them the suites of rooms belonging to the sultan's wives, the high ranking female officials of the Harem, and the sons, brothers, daughters and sisters of the sultan.

Harem-i Humayun is the private section of Sultan and his family and it was connected to the Selamlik section by a long corridor which was guarded all the time to make sure that nobody passes. Despite of being influenced by Western architecture and being built by taking European palaces as an example, in Dolmabahce, the Harem was designed as a separate section, although not rigid as it used to be in terms of space arrangements and functional relations.

The Harem area in the Dolmabahce Palace was set aside as the private residence of the Sultan, his mother, his official wives, royal princes and princesses. Harem has ten separate apartments; eight of these were set aside for the official and unofficial wives (Favorites) who were the mothers of the royal princes and princesses. The Harem also included a guest suite for special guests. The first two apartments are situated parallel to the Bosphorus Strait and these were reserved for the ruling Sultan and his mother.

Harem-i Humayun is a private living space integrated to the whole under the same roof so it is not a building separated from the Palace. Harem was strictly prohibited by any man to go in, except the sultan himself of course and the eunuch servants. The Harem section is formed by several halls, rooms and baths. There were rooms for official wives, suites of the sultan, quarter of the Queen mother (Valide Sultan), favorites (Gözde) and concubines (Cariye), and some education rooms for the young children of the sultan.

The other apartments in the harem were positioned at right angles to the sea. Each of the apartments has three stories and each has its own attic area as well. The apartments of the official and unofficial wives were situated in the middle of Sultan and his mother’s apartment enabling the queen mother to monitor the passing of the ladies to and from the Sultan’s apartment. Sultan’s mother (Mother Queen, and in Turkish Valide Sultan) was always on top of the rest of the ladies in hierarchy.

The Cariyes, (Concubines or maids in waiting) have also their apartments in this area. The Harem service bureaucracy was supervised by the “Mistress of the Harem”, the chief female chamberlain. Among those superintendent level maids in waiting assigned to provide services to the Sultan’s apartment were the head housekeeper, her deputy, the head coffee maker, the head urn carrier, the head food taster, the head barber, the head laundry woman, and other “first class” maids in waiting to the palace.

These maids had their own assistants who made up the “second class” of women serving the Sultan. Besides these women, there were approximately twenty other “high ranking” people (Mansipli) who provided special services to the Sultan’s private quarters. There were the other third class, fourth class servants in service like the person who maintained the stoves, the nursing stuff, and the medical officer.

It was not only Sultan’s apartment that employed a staff. Servants were assigned to each of the apartments in the Harem and even to the newly born princes and princesses. The word Cariye (Concubine) at that time referred to someone who was in the personal service of the Sultan, his mother, his wives and his children. During the reform period each apartment was assigned approximately ten Cariye among whom assigned to to Princes and Princesses was that of “Chief Governess”.

In the line of rank the Governess was followed by the wet nurse. Usually the daughters of the wet nurses were also among those who helped the young royals. There were generally between five and ten women in varying responsibilities who cared for the infants.

Among the most interesting and impressive features of Harem there are Blue and Pink Halls, the apartment of Valide Sultan (Mother Sultan), the rooms of Sultans Abdulmedjid, Abdulaziz and also Resad, matrons rooms, concubines section, Great Ataturk's study and bedroom and many valuable artifacts such as rugs and kilims, furniture, chandeliers, inscriptions, vases, oil paintings etc. Rooms and three baths of Harem-i Humayun section arranged informally around ten large halls, five on each floor.

Hall (I) of the Royal Women’s Apartment
The rooms located on the upper floor of the Harem that lead to the apartments of the wives and princesses were used for private parties and meetings hosted by members of the Harem. A wide staircase connects the first saloon with the main Harem entry hall below. A Japanese cabinet is one of the most interesting furnishings of this room.

Made up of both open shelves and areas closed with doors, the cabinet utilizes various decoration techniques including mother-of-pearl and ivory inlay, open work carvings on the wooden areas, doors covered with embroidered silk fabrics, and lacquered workmanship on the drawer faces and doors. This techniques could only have been done by different artisans, thus increasing the overall value of the piece. On the opposite wall is the large barrel organ made up of six barrels that emit music when the notes over them are turned. To the right of the women’s saloon is the upper floor of the corner apartment.

Apartments of the Royal Women
The bedroom furniture in this apartment was made in Istanbul and Rococo in style. The atmosphere is dominated by the rose motifs on the fabrics, a pattern that is repeated in the draperies. The ceiling and murals in the “everyday guest” room are decorated in a manner that is close to traditional Ottoman style and is different from most other sections that is decorated in western styles. The pieces that make up the living room set was carved on all four sides with very fine wood carving workmanship. The colors of the tile stove accord with the pastel tones that make up the main colors of the room itself.

Hall (II) of the Royal Women’s Apartment
This hall was used during the Ottoman period to host several activities and festivities as the party to mark the fact that a prince or princess had mastered the arts of reading, other such events / Qu’ran recitations, evening prayers during Ramadan, and prayers for the deceased).

The Baths of the Royal Women and the Mother Queen
The first of the baths along the corridor that overlooks the pool garden was designated for the use of Wives and the princesses. The second bath was reserved for the Mother Queen. The baths were entered from two separate dressing rooms, identified as the “cool” section. These two baths are symmetric in design and are reminiscent of the traditional “paired” baths used by the public (identical and adjacent separate areas set aside for men and women).

The Sultan’s Tiled Turkish Bath and Resting Room
The bath used by the Sultan reflects all of the traditional features of a Turkish bath consisting the “cool”, “hot”, and “resting” sections. The walls covered with tiles decorated with Art-Nouveau violet colored flowers which were the characteristics of the early 20th century art. The carved marble platform, basins, and the eagle figure perches on top of the faucets give the bath a unique appearance.

One of the most beautiful stoves of the palace collection is in this bath. The stove is made of ceramic plates decorated with traditional Ottoman motifs in shades of cobalt blue, turquoise, and green on a white background. The atmosphere of the resting room is enriched by the Turkish carpets on the floor.

The Blue Hall
The hall was named as “Blue Hall” due to the colors highlighted in its draperies and upholsteries. The Sultan, the Royal Women, and first class maids celebrated the Ramadan and Sacrificial holidays in this hall. As from the second half of the 19th century onwards the Ottoman Sultans used this hall for official receptions of foreign head of states. The Sultan’s mother, (or in her absence the head wife) would use this room to welcome and entertain the wife/wives of visiting head of state.

Even the wives or children of the Sultan were only allowed to enter or leave this hall by invitation or appointment. Members of the palaces’s most elite servants, persons directly selected by the Sultan himself, would guard the lower and upper floors of this hall throughout the day, having the full responsibility for everything that took place here. The four corners of the ceiling sectioned off with gold leaf panels have been decorated with landscapes representing the four seasons.

The carpet on the floor reflects European carpet design. The chandelier is made of French Baccarat crystal. The interior design, especially that of the Harem, was the work of French designer Sechan. In 1937 an elevator which has recently been restored, was built into the air shaft for the use of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. It is now on exhibition for visitors, thus recreating a living memory of the founder of Turkish Republic.

Sultans Resting Room
The room at the corner of the blue hall was used by the Sultan for resting and performing his religious rites. During the reign of Sultan Abdülmecid, the room was used to preserve the sacred beard hairs of the Prophet. The ceiling is decorated with frescoes and the wall with murals. Among the interesting pieces of the furniture are the gold leaf bedroom set and wardrobe. The decoration is complete with a Hereke carpet of scattered flower design.

Pink Hall
During the Ottoman period the hall was used by the Mother of the Sultan as her living room in which she hosted her special guests together with the other important Royal members of the Harem. Some of the family gathering that Sultan also participated were held here. A silver brazier stands in front of the Neo-Gothic corner seating arrangement bearing the Ottoman coat of arms that lines the walls of the Pink hall.

The rug in the center of the room is one of the palace’s best Hereke carpets. One of the paintings in this hall is the work of French artist Pierre Desire Guillement, while another is signed by Charles Chaplin. Among the portraits is the one of Dürrüşehvar Sultan, the daughter of the last Caliph, Abdulmecid Efendi.

The Palace of the Crown Prince
On the east of the harem section The Palace of the Crown Prince is located. It is a separate structure and they are separated by a wall but it appears as an extension of the main palace when viewed from the water.

SULTAN’S ROOM IN THE HAREM

The administrative (Men’s) section of the palace ends with the apartment of the Sultan and the Harem section begins with the Sultan’s second apartment. For the time being, only the Sultan’s Royal room on the upper floor of the Harem is open to public. This room is known as the “Crimson Room” due to the tones of red used on the walls and the furniture. Sultan used this room in the Harem for receptions and resting. Here he received his wives, children, other members of the dynasty, and Harem officials.

The walls of the room are covered with wooden panels clothed with a fabric. The interior design was the work of one of the palace designers, Sechan. After the completion of the design and paperwork, it was first submitted to Sultan for his approval and then it was applied later on. The gilding and white lacquer of the furniture is a very good example of Neo-classical, Rococo style.

The ebony table in the center of the room was embellished with the monogram of Sultan Abdülmecid. The fireplace is huge and combines the movement, depth, and the magnificence representing the Baroque with that of “Empire” style. The floral motifs and decorative elements lined up across the marble surface created by carving, relief, and gluing techniques and then a great deal of gilding was used to complete the embellishments.

HEAD MAID’S ROOM

While the number of women serving the Sultan often changed, there were an average 20 – 25 “Cariye” (maids-in-waiting) at most times. The head of these women was called the “Hazinedar Usta” (Mistress of the Harem) who was the highest ranking of the cariyes. Throughout the day she both guard the quarters and served the Sultan. The rooms are located in the Harem Entrance hall; the two seaside rooms adjoining the hall and the rooms located at the landside were used by cariyes.

The first room was called “Mother of pearl room” for its beautiful wooden furniture inlaid with mother of pearl. The cabinets placed at the both ends of the main table, was made with a kind of parquetry technique called “Eser-i Istanbul” in which tortoise shells were used for the background of the relief. The mirrored cabin and writing desks are of Damascus style, embellished with a relief of almond shaped wood outlined with fine silver wires.

The second corner room at the landside of the Hall was also allocated to the use of cariyes; this room contains a collection of furniture made with parquetry style, which was traditional in the southern states of the Ottoman Empire. In this traditional style, wood of varying colors is cut into tiny, micrometric size pieces and then joined into a geometrical composition. This very fine parquetry workmanship can be seen in all of the pieces in this room.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : National Palaces Administration

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 2593292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

DOLMABAHÇE PALACE MUSEUM / MUAYEDE HALL

Dolmabahçe, Beşiktaş - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°02'22.3"N 29°00'07.0"E / 41.039528, 29.001944



PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

Situated between the Administrative section (Mabeyn) and the Harem, this hall is the most magnificent hall in the entire palace. The Muayede (Ceremonial) Hall used to host all state ceremonies, and receptions, especially those held for religious holidays. During the Ramadan and Sacrificial religious feasts, the ceremonial throne would be brought from the treasury of the Topkapi Palace and placed against the far wall of the hall.

Following the holiday morning prayer, Sultan would rest for a while in a chamber located on the right of the throne. While he was resting, the state officials would enter the room and assume the places they had been assigned. Before the officials holiday greeting ceremony would begin, Sultan would first accept the well wishes of the princes, and the assembled guests.

The ambassadors would gather in the balcony located just the opposite of the throne, while the other guests would take their places in the left balcony. The palace orchestra would be assembled in the right balcony. The Harem women would gather in front of the windows of the seaside passageway to watch the ceremony. This gorgeous ceremonial hall witnessed many important receptions.

On ceremonial occasions the gold throne would be carried here from Topkapı Palace, and seated here the sultan would exchange congratulations on  religious festivals with hundreds of statesmen and other official guests. On such traditional occasions foreign ambassadors and guests would sit in one of the upper galleries, another being reserved for the palace orchestra.

It was here that Sultan Abdülmecid hosted a reception for Marshall Pelissier, a commander in the Crimean War, and for Hungarian Emperor, Franz Joseph. After Sultan Abdülaziz, Sultan Murad V broke with long tradition and had his coronation ceremony performed in this hall rather than in Topkapı Palace (May 30, 1876). The opening meeting of the first Ottoman parliament, an event that was considered to be a turning point in the history of the Ottoman Empire, was also held in this hall (March 19, 1877).

The Muayede Hall encompasses approximately 2000 square meters. It is 36 meters high and the dome has a diameter of 25 meters. There are 56 columns in the hall. The Hereke carpet on the floor is 124 square meters, and is of embossed, European design. The Palace’s largest, heaviest, and the most magnificent chandelier hangs in this hall. Manufactured in England in 1853, the chandelier holds 664 bulbs, and weighs 4,5 tons.

Originally the chandelier was powered with city gas, but it was modified and converted to electricity in 1912. A room leads off from each of the four corners of the hall. The two rooms facing the land have domed ceiling.

Six stoke pits under the floor provide the heating. Upper galleries were used by foreign ambassadors who invited to the religious ceremonies but also by the orchestra at special occasions. During the winter period, the Ceremonial hall was heated with the hot air blown from the heating system at the bottom of 56 tall columns (central heating system blowing warm air from the foot of the columns providing comfortable temperature even in coldest days); it took them about 3 days to heat the hall properly before any ceremony.

During the first years of the Republic, Muayede hall was also used to host various state receptions. It was in this hall that, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk made his first speech to the people of Istanbul as the president of the Republic. The text of his speech was placed in this hall. Ataturk also opened the “History Exhibition” in this hall, an exhibition that was organized in connection with the Second Turkish History Congress.

Following the death of Ataturk, the founder of Turkish Republic, on November 10, 1938, his body was placed in this hall in a casket and remained here for some time for public to visit to express their condolences.

CEREMONIAL HALL
Ceremonial Hall is located in the centre of main building and is twice-high of the buildings reciding on both sides. This hall was being used for ceremonies. With its architectural static structure and decorations this building is an awe-inspiring building. Ceremonial Hall is covered with domes from the inside, and with a roof from the outside. It is remarkable from other halls with its height and design.

Sultan Abdülhamit II (1876 – 1909 ) declared the The Basic Law of the Ottoman Empire (The First Constitutional Era) in this hall with a magnificent ceremony. On that night the buildings in the city got decorated and torchlight prorcessions were arranged. The public cheered over infront of Dolmabahce Palace and the estate of Midhat Pasha, the architecture of the Basic Law, and infront of other embassies. Also Sultan Abdülhamit II greeted the people from the window of The Glass Villa which is also located in Dolmabahçe Palace. 44 days later, on 5 February 1877 Midhat Pasha got exiled from the docks of the palace to Europe.

Ceremonial Hall witnessed two more historical moments after the declaration of the rebublic. First one happened when Mustafa Kemal Pasha who left Istanbul on 16 May 1919 as a military personal, returned to Istanbul as the president of the republic on 1927. 8 years later Istanbul rejoined with Ataturk in these halls. The second one happened on 10 November 1938. Ataturk’s funeral prayer took place in the very same hall. On November 16, his body laid in state for the people to visit him one last time, and kept in the Ceremonial Hall for 3 more days.

SUFERA (AMBASSADORS) HALL

Undoubtedly one of the most important halls in the Palace, the Sufera hall was used to host formal receptions, meetings and to receive Ambassadors. After the foundation of the Republic, this hall witnessed several historical events of which the most important ones were related with conducting the preliminary works on cultural reforms under the leadership of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk.

The lavish decoration of the hall befits its function as flaunting the Empire’s magnificence to foreign guests. The ceiling is decorated with gilded plaster moldings, while the fireplaces, at each of the four corners are framed with European porcelain tiles. The crystal pediments of the fireplaces are encircled with carved frames.

The piano bears the monogram of Sultan of Sultan Abdülmecid. The furniture is reminiscent of Rococo style. The floor is covered with 88 square meter carpet, woven in Tebriz, Iran. The silver clock, represented to Sultan Abdülhamid II by Abbas Hilmi Pasha, the Khedive (viceroy) of Egypt, as a sign of his loyalty, has four functions; showing the time, calendar, barometer, and thermometer.

The clock bears the signature of its Austrian artist, Wilhelm Kirsch, and an inscription dedicated to Sultan. The inscription reads “May your every minute be an hour, and your every hour a hundred years”. Among the other interesting pieces of the palace collection found in this hall is a pair of bearskins, a gift of Russian Czar Nicholas II.

THE GUEST ROOM (IN SUFERA HALL)

This room was reserved and used as the waiting room for ambassadors or other important guests who were about to be received by the Sultan. Paintings on the walls are rare examples of Ayvazovski. The gilded mirrored console standing at the entry bears the monogram of Sultan Abdülmecid. An interesting feature of the guest room is that its decor has been further enlivened with trompe l’oile murals of tulle-like draperies.

THE RECEPTION ROOM

On the land side of the Ambassadorial hall is the Reception room, which is consists of two sections; at the immediate entrance we come across the last waiting room, where ambassadors, foreign diplomats, and official guests of Sultan used to wait for their official reception. There are two paintings on the walls of this room; one depicting the Turkish-Greek war of 1897, by German artist, Theodor Rocholl, and the other, by Italian artist, Fausto Zonaro. There is also a mosaic style painting, depicting the ruins of ancient Rome.

Next to the Last waiting room is the so called “Red Room” or the “Ambassador’s Reception Room” where ambassadors and foreign diplomats were officially received by the Sultan. The gilded and cassette ceiling, tulle-like trompe l’oile, Louis XVI seating group, and gilded single piece cornices all combine and reflect the opulence of the Ottoman Empire. On the walls there are three Ayvazovski paintings; “Sailboat at sea”, “Stormy sea”, and “the landscape”.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : National Palaces Administration

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 2593292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, September 2, 2017

DOLMABAHÇE PALACE MUSEUM / MABEYN-I HÜMAYUN

Dolmabahçe, Beşiktaş - İstanbul - Turkey

GPS : 41°02'19.7"N 28°59'58.3"E / 41.038806, 28.999528



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MABEYN-I HÜMAYUN

The Mabeyn where the sultan conducted affairs of state is the most important section in terms of function and splendour. The entrance hall known as the Medhal Salon, the Crystal Staircase, and the Süfera Salon where foreign ambassadors were entertained prior to audience with the sultan in the Red Room are all decorated and furnished in a style reflecting the historical magnificence of the empire. These apartments include a magnificent hamam faced with Egyptian marble, a study and drawing rooms.

Mabeyn-i Humayun is where state affairs take place and the most important and also prominent section in terms of function and splendor. There is very large hall at the entrance, a crystal staircase and other decorative elements to impress the visitors. A couple of large halls upstairs decorated with crystal chandeliers, Hereke carpets and fireplaces, and a fine imperial Hamam ( Bath ) decorated with Egyptian alabaster are other impressive parts of the Selamlik section.

SULTANATE DOOR

GPS : 41°02'20.9"N 28°59'54.4"E / 41.039136, 28.998439

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There are two main gates of Dolmabahçe Palace’s landside. Sultanate (ceremony) Door and Treasury Door. Sultanate Door is bigger and more magnificent. The door’s main feature is its being concave both from inside and outside. There are five more mansion doors of the palace. The middle one is bigger and ornate compared to the others. It is across to the Muayede Hall. Also, there are seven secondary enterance doors in the palace.

The gate used by the Sultan and other high ranking officials to enter and exit the Palace is referred to the “Binek” Gate, (the Entrance Gate). Sultan used this gate for unofficial, daily comings and goings, whereas he used the Medhal Hall gate to leave for, or return from official, religious ceremonies or rites. In case Sultan intended to make a land trip, one of his royal carriages (landau or brougham) would be ready in front of the gate of the Entrance Hall. If he decides to make a boat trip with a caique (a traditional boat), then the gate facing the Bosphorus Strait would be used. These two gates were also used by the Palace officials when entering and leaving the palace.

TREASURY DOOR

GPS : 41°02'17.1"N 28°59'49.3"E / 41.038070, 28.997040

Treasury Door is located at the Clock Tower side and combines Muhafızlar and Eski Mefruşat houses. It look magnificent with its huge size and ornements. It is the main enterance with epigraph and sultan’s signature (tuğra).

MEDHAL HALL (Main Entrance)

A visit to the Dolmabahce Palace begins at the Medhal Hall. The word “Medhal” means “entry” in Turkish. From the Medhal hall, several rooms facing both the Bosphorus and the land sides, can be accessed. At the entrance, Medhal Salon welcomes the visitors, Crystal Stairs provides the connection with the upper floor, and Sufera (ambassadors) Salon is the guest room where the ambassadors were entertained and Red Room is where they were admitted by the sultan and it is all decorated and furnished to emphasize the historical splendor of the Empire.

Rooms facing the Bosphorus were used by leading Ottoman officials, the Grand Vizier and several other state ministers, while the rooms facing the land were used by various administrators of the palace and state officials such as the Palace Marshall, Sheikhulislam (the leading religious authority), and members of the House of Representatives (Meclis-i Mebusan), and the Senate (Meclis-i Ayan). Guests who were invited to attend a ceremony or a meeting in the palace, would first wait in this hall and then would be led inside at a proper time by a palace protocol officer.

Upon entering the Medhal hall, visitors will see on either side of the room the Boulle tables which bear the monogram of Sultan Abdulmecid who commissioned the palace. The Royal monogram of the Sultan is also repeated in the plates on the fireplace, in the dark blue Sévres vases, and over the doors. The English chandelier hanging in the middle of the room has sixty arms. The large porcelain vases standing to the right and left were manufactured in Yildiz Tile and Porcelain factory located in Istanbul. The Hereke fabrics used as upholstery for the furniture and as draperies, are in the Royal shade of red.

ENTRANCE HALL

Geometric panels was used to partition the ceiling over the oval room. The European fireplace with its pink background is flanked on either side by two consoles that bases a pair of French opal vases bearing the Baccarat mark and the date 1869. On each side of the hall, there are symmetrical baroque style staircases, one leads to the rear court garden, and the other lead the way to the basement facing the beautiful Bosphorus.

The Hall was decorated with white lacquered, neo-classic style furniture. Hereke carpets and rugs were used for the upholstery and draperies. The 45 square meter Hereke carpet is made of wool representing the perfection of Gordes knotting technique. Upon leaving the Entrance Hall, on the right we come across a room that was used as the office of the chief aide-de-camp during the Second Reform Period. The second room was used by his assistants. The Turkish History Association used this second room as an office during the early days of the Republic.

THE SECRETARIAT’S ROOM

As visitors walk from the Medhal hall to the right, they come to a second room, the Clerk’s Hall, also referred as the “Tiled Room”. Hanged on the left wall is the largest painting of the Palace collection; a depiction of the “Surre Procession” painted by Stefano Ussi in 1887. The word “surre”, which actually means coin purse, bag, or sack, was used to refer to the caravan organized right from the early years of the Ottoman Empire, that traveled from Istanbul to Mecca during the religious month of Recep, carrying financial aid used to support the maintenance and decoration of the Kaaba, and to provide help to the local population of Hecaz.

On the wall to the right is a painting signed by Austrian artist, Rudolph Ernest, depicting the fire at the Paris Municipal Theatre, and on the opposite wall there is another painting depicting a Dutch girl by Delandre. Decorated with French style furniture, this room has very valuable porcelain vases some of which manufactured in Istanbul factories and others originated from far east and Russia.

The first room to the right as visitors leave the Clerk’s hall is the room used by the Chief Secretary of the Palace during the Second Reform Period. A gilded French clock stays on a mirrored console in front of the room. As visitors exit the Chief Secretary room, they come to the Clerk’s Room used by the clerks under the Chief Secretary. On the wall hangs a rug depicting the borders of the Ottoman Empire at the close of the 19th century.

CRYSTAL STAIRCASE

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The baroque style staircase, leading from the official entry gate to the Palace’s upper sections, has a beautiful crystal balustrade, and topped by a large Baccarat crystal chandelier. This is why it was called the “Crystal staircase”. It is also called “Staircase of Sultanate”. As visitors ascend the crystal staircase they reach to the entrance of Sufera (Ambassadors) hall. The ivory and silver candelabra, incense holder standing in front of the door, was a gift of Ahmed Ratib Pasha, the governor of the Hejaz in Saudi Arabia, to Sultan Abdulhamid II.

A protocol staircase in harem which provides a passage from Harem to Entrance hall and Muayede (Grand Ceremonial) Hall. Sultan used this staircase after the religious ceremonies taking place at the Muayede Hall, on the way to the Blue Hall in the Harem where he greeted his family, and Harem members for the religious festivity. The staircase, in line with its function, is ornamented with cross vault, and illuminated by a French Baccarat chandelier, so gorgeous with its red crystal glass covers.

THE ROOMS OF THE CROWN PRINCE

Leading from the Sufera Hall are two small chambers located on the Bosphorus side of the Palace. These rooms were set aside for the use of the Crown Prince.

ZULVECHEYN HALL (THE PRIVY CHAMBER)

Two private apartments at the Dolmabahce Palace were allocated to private use of the ruling Sultan. One of these was in the administrative (men’s or mabeyn) side of the Palace, while the other was located in the family quarters, the Harem. These rooms were called ” Hunkar “, or ” Hususi ” (privy) apartments. The ruling Sultan used these apartments as a daily office area and a place to receive his guests, dine, rest, and bathe as well.

The private apartment in the administrative wing included the ” Zulvecheyn ” hall. The word “zulvecheyn” is an Arabic word which means “double fronted”. This name was given to this hall due to fact that it is situated adjacent to both Administrative and and the Harem quarters.

Zulvecheyn Hall was sometimes used for very important receptions. Some of the traditional fast-breaking dinners were given here during the month of Ramadan, and traditional Ramadan evening prayer, “Teravih” was also held in this room. Instructive religious classes were held here just before breaking the fast, prominent religious figures were called upon to elucidate on religious matters to the Sultan.

The most significant decorative aspect of this hall is undoubtedly the parquet floor which reflect exquisite workmanship and work of art. On each side of the door are consoles embellished with Istanbul mother-of-pearl relief. These consoles were moved here from the Ciragan Palace. A gilded table with legs carved with the relief of mythological animal figures, holds a dark blue Sérves vase. The tops of the small tables in front of the couches along the wall facing the sea are made of “malachite”. This is one of the rare examples of such excessive use of a such precious stone.

SULTAN’S ROOM

This room was used by the Sultans as a private chamber where they dined, prayed, and received their personal guests. However, between the years 1922-1924, Caliph Abdulmecid used this chamber as a music room. Inside there is a painting signed by Caliph Abdülmecid himself, depicting the dethronement of Sultan Abdulhamid II. Other significant items found in the room, are the collection of classical western music notes stored in the built-in-closet, and the portrait of Pierre Loti hanging over the console.

ATATÜRK ROOM
Mustafa Kemal Atatürk spent the last days of his life in the palace as his health deteriorated. He died at 9:05 a.m. on November 10, 1938, in a bedroom, located in the former Harem section of the palace. All the clocks in the palace were stopped and set to 9:05 after his death. Although this has changed recently and the clocks outside of his room are now set to the actual time in Turkey, the clock in the room where he died is still pointing to 9:05 a.m.

PASSAGEWAY TO THE HAREM

The passageway connects six interconnecting corridors and two halls and has a total of eight doors, two of which are made of steel. The passageway leads to the Sultan’s apartment where palace functionaries, called “musahib” (gentlemen-in-waiting) maintained continual watch. The walls of the passageway are decorated with several paintings signed by Ottoman and foreign artists.

CALIPH ABDULMECID LIBRARY

Next to Zulvecheyn hall is a room used as a private library by Caliph Abdulmecid. In addition to the collection of books written in Ottoman language, the library contains books in many other languages, French, German and English. On the walls, some photographs and a self-portrait painted by Caliph Abdulmecid himself, are hanging.

STUDY ROOM

This room was used by the Sultan to take a short break, and relax for a while amidst his works. The floor is covered with parquet in honeycomb design. Lyre-shaped chairs and the Neo-classical Berger seating arrangements are of interest. This room was also referred as the “Bird Room” , both because it overlooks the palace’s aviary and because its drapery cornices are decorated with bird relief. The tile stove in the room was made by Hardmunt. The room contains various musical instruments of which the most significant is the Steinway piano made in 1911. This piano bears the monogram of Caliph Abdulmecid.

THE SULTAN’S TURKISH HAMAM (BATH)

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The entrance door of the bath was decorated on either side by Bohemian crystal sconces. Sultan’s Bath is made up of three interconnecting rooms. The first room which as also called the “cool” room, is the changing room where Sultan undresses and rests after bathing. The heating stove in the room is decorated with ceramic plates in Baroque style. To the right of the door is a hanging French made pendulum brass clock.

The door leading to the second area of the bath is covered with red broadcloth bearing the monogram of Sultan Abdulmecid. This monogram signifies that; ” one is entering an area that is private to that of the Sultan”. This door leads to the “warm” section of the bath, in which there are two chambers. The first is called the hot changing area was also used for resting. Next to this is the main chamber of the bath; the “hot section”.

The walls of the hot changing area and the hot section are covered with Egyptian Alabaster marble which has a translucent quality while the floor is covered with Marmara marble. The ceiling is in a ship vaulting style, which has been covered by a glass and steel construction framed with steel. The ceilings of the cool and the warm rooms have the light piercing “elephant eye” openings used in the domes of traditional Turkish baths. The bath was heated by a system located underneath the floor called stoke pit method.

MEMORIAL HALL

The last chamber in the Sultan’s apartments which was used as a passageway, is located in between the Harem and the Grand Ceremonial Hall. Today this chamber is referred to as the “Memorial Hall” because of the portraits of Sultan Abdülmecid, who commissioned this palace, his father, Sultan Mahmud II, his brother Sultan Abdülaziz, and Sultan Mehmed Reşad V. The walls are also decorated with Ottoman coats-of-arms that were embroidered with a variety of techniques.

On the table is a German / Berlin KPM (Royal Porcelain Manufacture) vase, a gift of Kaiser Wilhelm II, who visited Istanbul three times. On one face of the vase is a portrait of Wilhelm, and on the other face there is depiction of Pos tame Place. The other german vase has the portrait of Kaiser Wilhelm I. In addition to these two vases, there are also two bronze sculptures of two emperors; Wilhelm I of Germany, and Franz Joseph of Austria.

DINING HALL BY CARIYES

In the last years of the Ottoman Empire, this room was used as a dining hall by cariyes (maids-in-waiting). Today this room is being as an exhibit hall where some of the valuable items selected from seven thousand items that make up the palace collection, are on exhibit.

SUPPLY DEPOT

This hall was used as pantry/supply depot of the palace. Today, this hall is being used as an exhibition hall where some of the personal items of the Sultans are on exhibit. Especially precious dinner service sets are flash, made of gold, silver, gold plated, porcelain, crystal, and many other precious metals.

MESCIT AND RESTING ROOM

The word “Mescit” refers to a section of a house or a building which is used for Islamic ritual of worship (namaz). The Mescit room of the Dolmabahce Palace is quite unostentatious, yet very stylishly decorated. On the right wall is a panel bearing the “Besmele” (inscription meaning: “In the name of God, the Compassionate, the Merciful”). Other walls are also decorated by several calligraphic works of Sultan Abdulmecid. The brilliant chandelier is made of Italian Murano glass.

In front of the “Mihrab”, the niche indicating the direction to Mecca, Kaaba (the direction for worship), stand two Ottoman “rahle”, Qu’ran reading stands, and prayer rug handmade in Khorasan. The English clock standing between the two windows has a walnut case. Next to mescit is the room for resting. Here, blue is the main color which was used in the furniture and drapes. The table, adorned with fruit baskets, is an example of the fine workmanship of Italian Petre Dure’s stone repoussé art.

GLASS PAVILION

GPS : 41°02'24.7"N 28°59'57.9"E / 41.040191, 28.999421

PHOTOGRAPHS ALBUM

Smith  as of 1852 he had helped procure materials from foreign countries for the palace, and had worked especially on the monumental staircase and its roofng can be traced in the documents. Finally, in the years 1853-1854, he built the Dolmabahçe Palace Camlı Köşk (Glass Pavilion) and the Alay Pavilion for Sultan Abdülmecid. Camlı
Köşk was realized as a viewing pavilion that allowed the Sultan to see the street.

The winter garden that gave its name to this special pavilion must have been an annex suggested by Smith. This köşk is the only structure opening onto the outside world beyond the palace. The light structure of the conservatory of Camlı Köşk contrasts strikingly with the heavy and blind structure of the rest of the building, as if designed to place the two architectural techniques side by side to achieve the most startling impact.

LOCATION SATELLITE MAP



WEB SITE : National Palaces Administration

MORE INFO & CONTACT
E-Mail : millisaraylar@tbmm.gov.tr
Phone : +90 212 236 9000
Fax : +90 212 2593292

These scripts and photographs are registered under © Copyright 2017, respected writers and photographers from the internet. All Rights Reserved.